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7 standout moments from the third Democratic debate in Houston

Business Insider

2020 Democratic debateJonathan Bachman/Reuters

  • On September 12, ten of the top Democratic presidential candidates gathered in Houston, Texas for the third Democratic primary debate hosted by ABC. 
  • Right off the bat, Andrew Yang made waves by announcing an online raffle to give 10 American families a "Freedom Dividend" universal basic income of $1,000 a month for a year. 
  • Later in the debate, former HUD Secretary Julian Castro took several shots at Vice President Joe Biden, both of whom served in former President Barack Obama’s administration together. 
  • Here are the biggest moments from Thursday night’s debate. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On September 12, ten of the top Democratic presidential candidates gathered in Houston, Texas for the third Democratic primary debate hosted by ABC. 

Overall, the ABC debate had less direct conflict and fewer dramatic clashes between the candidates than the June and July debates.

Right off the bat, Andrew Yang made waves by announcing an online raffle to give 10 American families a "Freedom Dividend" universal basic income of $1,000 a month for a year. 

Read more: Biden touts Obamacare while slamming Sanders and Warren’s healthcare plans

Later in the debate, former HUD Secretary Julian Castro took several shots at Vice President Joe Biden, both of whom served in former President Barack Obama’s administration together. 

"I’m fulfilling the legacy of Barack Obama and you’re not," Castro told Biden of his healthcare plan, to which Biden shot back, "That’ll be a surprise to him."

While the rest of the debate was relatively tame, Sen. Kamala Harris got in some zingers at Trump, and Sen. Bernie Sanders thoroughly denounced Venezuelan dictator Nicholas Maduro and explained his vision of Democratic socialism. 

Here’s a rundown of the seven biggest moments: 

Andrew Yang announced his campaign would give away a $12,000 annual universal basic income to 10 families.

Jonathan Bachman/Reutrers

Andrew Yang‘s flagship campaign proposal is a universal basic income of $1,000 a month for every American adult, which he calls the Freedom Dividend. 

The raffle, first reported by Politico, will begin online next week, and will give ten winning families $1,000 a month for a year. The universal basic income program, which Yang calls the Freedom Dividend, is his flagship campaign proposal.

"It’s time to trust ourselves more than our politicians," Yang said. "My campaign will now give a Freedom Dividend of $12,000 per year to 10 families. This is how we will get our country working for us again, the American people."

Julian Castro went after Joe Biden on both healthcare and immigration.

Mike Blake/Reuters

One of the biggest clashes of the night was between former Vice President Joe Biden and former HUD Secretary Julian Castro, who served in former President Barack Obama’s administration together. 

Castro argued that while his plan would automatically enroll people who didn’t have private insurance into a public option when they lost their jobs, for example, Biden’s would require people to actively enroll.

"The difference between what I support and what you support is that you require them to opt-in, and I do not require them to opt in," Castro said. "Barack Obama’s vision was not to leave 10 million people uncovered, he wanted every single person in this country to be covered."

Biden argued that people would not have to buy in to Medicare under his plan, but Castro pushed back, saying, "You just said two minutes ago that people would have to buy in — are you forgetting already what you said two minutes ago?" We need a system that automatically enrolls people no matter what," Castro said.

I’m fulfilling the legacy of Barack Obama and you’re not," Castro told Biden, to which Biden shot back, "That’ll be a surprise to him."

On the issue of immigration, Castro further accused Biden of constantly name-dropping Obama while shying away from the more controversial parts of Obama’s record on immigration.

And Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Amy Klobuchar admonished their rivals Biden and Castro for trading barbs with each other.

Mike Blake/Reutrers

Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Amy Klobuchar had otherwise unremarkable nights on the debate stage, but did get in some digs at their opponents. 

"This is why presidential debates have become unwatchable, this reminds people of what they cannot stand about Washington; people scoring points at each other, people poking at each other," Buttigieg said after Castro and Biden’s spat. 

"A house divided cannot stand," Klobuchar further admonished, quoting Abraham Lincoln.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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SEE ALSO: Democrats are clashing over how to fix US health care. Here are the 7 key terms you need to know.

gpanetta@businessinsider.com (Grace Panetta)

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